Tuesday, March 20, 2012

On The Murder Of Little Girls

Miriam Monsonego, Tolouse, France.
Zainab Rabea, Homs, Syria.


The two little girls never met.  They spoke different languages, liked different foods, and prayed to different gods.  But both were little girls.  They both had parents, and friends, and dreams.  They both brought joy to the worlds in which they lived.


Miriam and Zainab both died this week.  They were killed within 48 hours of each other.  They died of the same cause: gunshot wounds.  Their deaths caused the same anguish in their communities, the same outpourings of pure grief and pain, and the same questions about who in their right mind could bring themselves to commit such a notorious act as shooting a little girl.


Miriam and Zainab were murdered, but not for who they were or what they believed in.  They were both part of a complex, cruel, and often insensitive world.  It is a world in which men - grown and educated men - hold the righteousness of their ideas over the lives of others.  It is a world where men allow themselves to be blinded by fear and commit atrocities of an unspeakable nature.  It was not the bullets that were radical, despicable, and senseless.  Miriam and Zainab were killed by bullets, but they were murdered by politics.


Will it continue in the wake of their deaths?  Will politics beget politics in light of these two tragedies, unrelated in cause but completely related in sheer human suffering?  Or will these horrific acts of violence shock us out of the fragile political dwellings we inhabit into the cold world in which two little girls have been murdered?  Will we try to reconstruct our politics to seclude ourselves from the problem...or have the wisdom to see that politics is the problem?  As an answer becomes clear in the coming weeks, life will carry on past these cursed events.  Past the raw suffering and pain.  And past two small corpses which will soon lie in eternal rest and - we pray - in peace.



Miriam Monsonego, Tolouse, France.
Zainab Rabea, Homs, Syria.


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